Research

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Using the black hole merger rate inferred from LIGO, we calculate the abundance of tightly bound binary black holes in the Milky Way galaxy. Binaries with a small semimajor axis originate at larger separations through conventional formation mechanisms and evolve as a result of gravitational wave emission. We find that LISA could detect them in the Milky Way. We also identify possible X-ray signatures of such binaries.




One avenue for testing the no-hair theorem is obtained through timing a pulsar orbiting close to a black hole and fitting for quadrupolar effects on the time-of-arrival of pulses. If deviations from the Kerr quadrupole are measured, then the no-hair theorem isinvalidated. To this end, we derive an expression for the light travel time delay for a pulsar orbiting in a black-hole spacetime described by the Butterworth-Ipser metric, which has an arbitrary spin and quadrupole moment. We consider terms up to the quadrupole order in the black-hole metric and derive the time-delay expression in a closed analytic form. This allows for fast computations that are useful in fitting time-of-arrival observations of pulsars orbiting close to astrophysical black holes.





Newton’s theorem of revolving orbits states that one can multiply the angular speed of a Keplerian orbit by a factor k by applying a radial inverse cubed force proportional to (1 − k2). In this paper we derive an extension of this theorem in general relativity, valid for the motion of massive particles in any static, spherically symmetric metrics. We verify the Newtonian limit of this extension and demonstrate that there is no such generalization for rotating metrics. Further we also extend the theory to the case of charged particles in the Einstein-Maxwell and Kaluza-Klein theories. 





We show that an interferometer moving at a relativistic speed relative to a point source of light offers a sensitive probe of acceleration. Such an accelerometer contains no moving parts, and is thus more robust than conventional ”mass-on-a-spring” accelerometers. In an interstellar mission to AlphaCentauri, such an accelerometer could be used to measure the masses of exoplanets and their host stars as well as test theories of modified gravity.





The presence of a circumnuclear stellar disk around Sgr A* and megamaser systems near other black holes indicates that dense neutral disks can be found in galactic nuclei. We show that depending on their inclination angle, optical depth, and spin temperature, these disks could be observed spectroscopically through 21 cm absorption. Related spectroscopic observations of Sgr A* can determine its HI disk parameters and the possible presence of gaps in the disk. Clumps of dense gas similar to the G2 could could also be detected in 21 cm absorption against Sgr A* radio emission.




Millimeter-wavelength VLBI observations of the supermassive black holes in Sgr A* and M87 by the Event Horizon Telescope could potentially trace the dynamics of ejected plasma blobs in real time. We demonstrate that the trajectory and tidal stretching of these blobs can be used to test general relativity and set new constraints on the mass and spin of these black holes.





We consider the time derivatives of the period P of pulsars at the Galactic Center due to variations in their orbital Doppler shifts. We show that in conjunction with a measurement of a pulsar’s proper motion and its projected separation from the supermassive black hole, Sgr A*,measuring two of the period time derivatives sets a constraint that allows for the recovery of the complete six phase space coordinates of the pulsar’s orbit, as well as the enclosed mass within the orbit. Thus, one can use multiple pulsars at different distances from Sgr A* to determine the radial mass distribution of stars and stellar remnants at the Galactic center. Furthermore, we consider the effect of passing stars on the pulsar’s period derivatives and show how it can be exploited to measure the characteristic stellar mass in the Galactic Center.




The X-ray background during the epoch of reionization is currently poorly constrained. We demonstrate that it is possible to use first generation 21 cm experiments to calibrate it. Using the semi-numerical simulation, 21cmFAST, we calculate the dependence of the 21 cm power spectrum on the X-ray background flux. Comparing the signal to the sensitivity of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) we find that in the redshift interval z =8-14 the 21 cm signal is detectable for certain values of the X-ray background. We show that there is no degeneracy between the X-ray production efficiency and the Lyα production efficiency and that the degeneracy with the ionization fraction of the intergalactic medium can be broken.